November 13, 2013
thenewenlightenmentage:

This Day in Science History

Discovery of the 1000th Pulsar
13 November 1998
An international team of researchers using a giant radio telescope in Australia, equipped with a new “multibeam” receiver system, has just discovered the 1000th pulsar to be found within our Galaxy since the first few were discovered in Cambridge in 1967.
The team of researchers, comprised of astronomers from the UK, Australia, Italy and the USA, have been surveying the plane of our Galaxy, the Milky Way, for new radio pulsars using the 64-metre Parkes Radio Telescope in New South Wales, Australia. The powerful new “multibeam” receiver was built as a joint venture between engineers at the Australia Telescope National Facility and the University of Manchester’s Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories, Jodrell Bank, funded by the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

This Day in Science History

Discovery of the 1000th Pulsar

13 November 1998

An international team of researchers using a giant radio telescope in Australia, equipped with a new “multibeam” receiver system, has just discovered the 1000th pulsar to be found within our Galaxy since the first few were discovered in Cambridge in 1967.

The team of researchers, comprised of astronomers from the UK, Australia, Italy and the USA, have been surveying the plane of our Galaxy, the Milky Way, for new radio pulsars using the 64-metre Parkes Radio Telescope in New South Wales, Australia. The powerful new “multibeam” receiver was built as a joint venture between engineers at the Australia Telescope National Facility and the University of Manchester’s Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories, Jodrell Bank, funded by the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council.

Continue Reading

(via megacosms)

5:02pm
Filed under: astronomy history pulsar 
April 26, 2013
womenwhokickass:


Gertrude Pridgett “Ma” Rainey
Why she kicks ass:
She is considered by many to be the Mother of the Blues. The Georgia based singer was well known for her soulful, moaning vocals on blues records in the 1920s. She paved the way for other artists such as Bessie Smith and Billie Holiday.
Rainey’s on-stage persona, “Ma,” was a larger than life, flamboyant, and vivacious character that attracted much attention and cat-calling. She appeared in fancy costume dress and bellowing out vocals and encouraging crowds to dance. With her long, shining hair straightened and styled to stick out; her exuberant smile capped in gold, and often sporting large hats with colorful plumes and strings of gaudy, bright necklaces. She taught audiences how to dance the infamous “Black Bottom” dance, dripping with sexual innuendo and humor. She had a booming, confident sexuality and grace that captivated audiences wherever she went. 
 In 1923 she signed a contract with Paramount, becoming one of the first woman to ever sign a recording contract, as well as one of the first women to record the blues. No small feat for a poor African-American woman in 1920s Georgia. Rainey proved herself to be a hot commodity, producing over 100 recordings for Paramount, including several songs with Louis Armstrong and other important jazz and blues performers of the time. 
She lived the rest of her life acting as a mentor and coach to other performers, and using her performing arts houses to showcase great music and other acts.
 An inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as well as the Georgia Hall of Fame and the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame, Rainey has been influential on many modern day artists. Rainey has inspired a host of books, plays and songs and continues to delight and charm fans of the blues with her unique style and voice.  


<3 Ma Rainey <3

womenwhokickass:

Gertrude Pridgett “Ma” Rainey

Why she kicks ass:

  • She is considered by many to be the Mother of the Blues. The Georgia based singer was well known for her soulful, moaning vocals on blues records in the 1920s. She paved the way for other artists such as Bessie Smith and Billie Holiday.
  • Rainey’s on-stage persona, “Ma,” was a larger than life, flamboyant, and vivacious character that attracted much attention and cat-calling. She appeared in fancy costume dress and bellowing out vocals and encouraging crowds to dance. With her long, shining hair straightened and styled to stick out; her exuberant smile capped in gold, and often sporting large hats with colorful plumes and strings of gaudy, bright necklaces. She taught audiences how to dance the infamous “Black Bottom” dance, dripping with sexual innuendo and humor. She had a booming, confident sexuality and grace that captivated audiences wherever she went.
  •  In 1923 she signed a contract with Paramount, becoming one of the first woman to ever sign a recording contract, as well as one of the first women to record the blues. No small feat for a poor African-American woman in 1920s Georgia. Rainey proved herself to be a hot commodity, producing over 100 recordings for Paramount, including several songs with Louis Armstrong and other important jazz and blues performers of the time.
  • She lived the rest of her life acting as a mentor and coach to other performers, and using her performing arts houses to showcase great music and other acts.
  •  An inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as well as the Georgia Hall of Fame and the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame, Rainey has been influential on many modern day artists. Rainey has inspired a host of books, plays and songs and continues to delight and charm fans of the blues with her unique style and voice. 

<3 Ma Rainey <3

(via wespeakfortheearth)

1:56pm
Filed under: blues history music Ma Rainey 
April 22, 2013

via Tree Hugger:

The witch hunts of yore are among some of the darkest moments in history, with countless persons being falsely persecuted and even worse — executed. The 1612 trial of Pendle Hill’s accused witches is said to be the most notorious in England’s past, resulting in the hanging of ten people. To mark the event’s 400th anniversary last year, artist Philippe Handford created a series of stunning sculptures along a local forest trail, using felled, sectioned tree trunks that seem like they are frozen in act of falling.

April 5, 2012
Flux Machine, Twisted Historical Animated GIFs by Kevin J. Weir

laughingsquid:

decoy howitzer

Flux Machine, Twisted Historical Animated GIFs by Kevin J. Weir

(Source: fluxmachine)

11:58am
Filed under: art history animation 
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